University of California Small Grains
University of California Small Grains
University of California Small Grains
University of California
University of California Small Grains

Welcome to UC Small Grains Research & Information

We are an interdisciplinary team of University of California advisors, specialists and faculty. Our purpose is to provide to growers, researchers and industry professionals agronomic guidelines and information related to the production of small grains in California.

Small Grains in California

Small grains include wheat, barley, oats and triticale. Wheat, oats and barley are grown for grain and forage while triticale is primarily grown as forage. Wheat is the predominant small grain crop in California, where it is grown on over 500,000 acres. Although relatively low in value compared to many California crops, small grains serve as important rotation crops. In most regions of the state, small grains are grown from fall through spring, thus making good use of winter rainfall and requiring relatively little irrigation.

UC Small Grains Research and Information

UC-IPM Pest Management Guidelines
For Small Grains

UC/ANR and UC-IPM logos

Webtool screenshot Announcing an Interactive Webtool for Small Grain Variety Selection
The beta version of an interactive webtool for California small grain variety selection is now available on the Small Grains portion of the UC Agronomy Research and Information Center Website: http://smallgrains.ucanr.edu/Variety/ The tool is...

Fall planted sites 2016 17 2017 California Small Grain Variety Testing Data
Results from the 2016-2017 Fall-planted small grain variety trials throughout California are now available. These include tests of commercial and advanced varieties of common wheat, durum wheat, triticale, and barley, with multi-year productivity,...

In Season N Reference Start planning your nitrogen management strategy for fall-planted wheat now (and consider using a N-rich reference strip to manage your N more precisely)
Recent UCCE research has illustrated the value of in-season applications of nitrogen (N) fertilizer, particularly applications made at the early vegetative growth stages. This is typically the stage of growth when N demand from the crop is...

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